New York Burning: Liberty, Slavery, and Conspiracy in Eighteenth-Century Manhattan

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Vintage #ad - Exploring the political and social climate of the times, in a city rife with state intrigue and terror, Lepore dramatically shows how, the threat of black rebellion united the white political pluralities in a frenzy of racial fear and violence.  . Pulitzer prize finalist and anisfield-wolf award winnerin new york burning, Bancroft Prize-winning historian Jill Lepore recounts these dramatic events of 1741, when ten fires blazed across Manhattan and panicked whites suspecting it to be the work a slave uprising went on a rampage.

In the end, thirteen black men were burned at the stake, seventeen were hanged and more than one hundred black men and women were thrown into a dungeon beneath City Hall. Even back in the seventeenth century, communities and colors, the city was a rich mosaic of cultures, with slaves making up a full one-fifth of the population.

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The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity

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Vintage #ad - Winner of the bancroft prizeking philip's war, in proportion to population, the excruciating racial war—colonists against Indians—that erupted in New England in 1675, was, the bloodiest in American history. But jill lepore makes clear that it was after the war—and because of it—that the boundaries between cultures, hitherto blurred, turned into rigid ones.

Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war. The war's brutality compelled the colonists to defend themselves against accusations that they had become savages. King philip's war became one of the most written-about wars in our history, and Lepore argues that the words strengthened and hardened feelings that, in turn, strengthened and hardened the enmity between Indians and Anglos.

The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity #ad - Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves. Winner of the the 1998 ralph Waldo Emerson Award of the Phi Beta Kappa Society.

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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: The American Portraits Series

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Hill and Wang #ad - Resistance, collaboration, espionage, deception: pocahontas's life is here shown as a road map to Native American strategies of defiance exercised in the face of overwhelming odds and in the hope for a semblance of independence worth the name. Townsend's pocahontas emerges--as a young child on the banks of the Chesapeake, an influential noblewoman visiting a struggling Jamestown, an English gentlewoman in London--for the first time in three-dimensions; allowing us to see and sympathize with her people as never before.

Camilla townsend's stunning new book, pocahontas and the powhatan Dilemma, differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth century Native Americans were--in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading British but to ourselves.

Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: The American Portraits Series #ad - Neither naïve nor innocent, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, the powerful king Powhatan, diplomacy, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, and violence. Indeed, pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought against the military power of the colonizing English.

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The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death

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Vintage #ad - In between, life got longer, the stages of life multiplied, and matters of life and death moved from the library to the laboratory, from the humanities to the sciences. Lately, debates about life and death have determined the course of American politics. How does life begin? what does it mean? What happens when we die? “All anyone can do is ask, ” Lepore writes.

Investigating the surprising origins of the stuff of everyday life—from board games to breast pumps—Lepore argues that the age of discovery, Darwin, and the Space Age turned ideas about life on earth topsy-turvy. Renowned harvard scholar and new yorker staff writer Jill Lepore has composed a strikingly original, ingeniously conceived, and beautifully crafted history of American ideas about life and death from before the cradle to beyond the grave.

The Mansion of Happiness: A History of Life and Death #ad - That's why any history of ideas about life and death has to be, like this book, a history of curiosity. Lepore starts that history with the story of a seventeenth-century Englishman who had the idea that all life begins with an egg and ends it with an American who, in the 1970s, began freezing the dead.

New worlds were found, ” she writes, and “old paradises were lost. As much a meditation on the present as an excavation of the past, learned, The Mansion of Happiness is delightful, and altogether beguiling. Each of these debates has a history.

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The Story of America: Essays on Origins

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Princeton University Press #ad - And the dictionary. In this thoughtful and provocative book, Lepore offers at once a history of origin stories and a meditation on storytelling itself. In the story of america, harvard historian and new yorker staff writer jill Lepore investigates American origin stories--from John Smith's account of the founding of Jamestown in 1607 to Barack Obama's 2009 inaugural address--to show how American democracy is bound up with the history of print.

Along the way it presents fresh readings of benjamin franklin's way to wealth, novels of immigrants, and "Paul Revere's Ride" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Thomas Paine's Common Sense, "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including biographies of presidents, as well as histories of lesser-known genres, and accounts of the Depression.

The Story of America: Essays on Origins #ad - Part civics primer, part cultural history, The Story of America excavates the origins of everything from the paper ballot and the Constitution to the I. O. U. Over the centuries, Americans have read and written their way into a political culture of ink and type. From past to present, Lepore argues, Americans have wrestled with the idea of democracy by telling stories.

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Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

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Vintage #ad - Unlike him, she was a mother of twelve. Benjamin franklin, who wrote more letters to his sister than he wrote to anyone else, was the original American self-made man; his sister spent her life caring for her children. Making use of an amazing cache of little-studied material, including documents, and portraits only just discovered, objects, Jill Lepore brings Jane Franklin to life in a way that illuminates not only this one woman but an entire world—a world usually lost to history.

National book award finalistfrom one of our most accomplished and widely admired historians, a revelatory portrait of Benjamin Franklin’s youngest sister and a history of history itself. They left very different traces behind. Lepore’s life of jane franklin, with its strikingly original vantage on her remarkable brother, is at once a wholly different account of the founding of the United States and one of the great untold stories of American history and letters: a life unknown.

Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin #ad - Like her brother, a gifted writer, Jane Franklin was a passionate reader, and an astonishingly shrewd political commentator.

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The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History The Public Square

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Princeton University Press #ad - This book tells the story of the centuries-long struggle over the meaning of the nation's founding, including the battle waged by the Tea Party, Glenn Beck, Sarah Palin, and evangelical Christians to "take back America. Jill lepore, " which launched the tea party, harvard historian and new yorker staff writer, offers a careful and concerned look at American history according to the far right, from the "rant heard round the world, to the Texas School Board's adoption of a social-studies curriculum that teaches that the United States was established as a Christian nation.

Behind the tea party's revolution, strife, she argues, lies a nostalgic and even heartbreaking yearning for an imagined past--a time less troubled by ambiguity, and uncertainty--a yearning for an America that never was. The whites of their eyes reveals that the far right has embraced a narrative about America's founding that is not only a fable but is also, finally, a variety of fundamentalism--anti-intellectual, antihistorical, and dangerously antipluralist.

Along the way, she provides rare insight into the eighteenth-century struggle for independence--a history of the Revolution, from the archives. Lepore traces the roots of the far right's reactionary history to the bicentennial in the 1970s, when no one could agree on what story a divided nation should tell about its unruly beginnings.

The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History The Public Square #ad - In a new afterword, lepore addresses both the recent shift in Tea Party rhetoric from the Revolution to the Constitution and the diminished role of scholars as political commentators over the last half century of public debate. Civil rights leaders said they were the true sons of liberty--so did Southern segregationists.

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This America: The Case for the Nation

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Liveright #ad - A new york times book review editors’ choice selectionone of president bill clinton’s “Best Things I’ve Read This Year”From the acclaimed historian and New Yorker writer comes this urgent manifesto on the dilemma of nationalism and the erosion of liberalism in the twenty-first century. At a time of much despair over the future of liberal democracy, a follow-up to her much-celebrated history of the United States, Jill Lepore makes a stirring case for the nation in This America, These Truths.

With dangerous forms of nationalism on the rise, lepore, a harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer, repudiates nationalism here by explaining its long history—and the history of the idea of the nation itself—while calling for a “new Americanism”: a generous patriotism that requires an honest reckoning with America’s past.

Lepore begins her argument with a primer on the origins of nations, the nation-state, explaining how liberalism, and liberal nationalism, developed together. When serious historians abandon the study of the nation, ” Lepore tellingly writes, “nationalism doesn’t die. Much of american history, all the way down to the nation’s latest, has been a battle between these two forms of nationalism, Lepore argues, liberal and illiberal, bitter struggles over immigration.

This America: The Case for the Nation #ad - Defending liberalism, as This America demonstrates, requires making the case for the nation. But american historians largely abandoned that defense in the 1960s when they stopped writing national history. Instead, it eats liberalism. But liberalism is still in there, Lepore affirms, and This America is an attempt to pull it out.

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These Truths: A History of the United States

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A nation born in contradiction… will fight, over the meaning of its history, ” Lepore writes, forever, but engaging in that struggle by studying the past is part of the work of citizenship. The american experiment rests on three ideas—“these truths, natural rights, ” Jefferson called them—political equality, and the sovereignty of the people.

But has the nation, asking whether the course of events over more than five centuries has proven the nation’s truths, and democracy itself, beginning in 1492, delivered on that promise?These Truths tells this uniquely American story, or belied them. With these truths, lepore has produced a book that will shape our view of American history for decades to come.

These Truths: A History of the United States #ad - Nothing short of a masterpiece. Npr booksa new york times and washington post notable book of the YearIn the most ambitious one-volume American history in decades, award-winning historian Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the origins and rise of a divided nation. Widely hailed for its “sweeping, jill lepore’s one-volume history of America places truth itself—a devotion to facts, sobering account of the American past” New York Times Book Review, proof, and evidence—at the center of the nation’s history.

. To answer that question, lepore wrestles with the state of American politics, the persistence of inequality, the legacy of slavery, and the nature of technological change.

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Under the Starry Flag: How a Ban of Irish Americans Joined the Fenian Revolt and Sparked a Crisis over Citizenship

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Harvard University Press #ad - Lucy salyer recounts this gripping tale, a prelude to today’s immigration battles. Claiming that emigrants to america remained British citizens, authorities arrested the men for treason, sparking a crisis and trial that dragged the U. S. In 1867 forty irish-americans sailed for Ireland to fight against British rule.

Under the Starry Flag: How a Ban of Irish Americans Joined the Fenian Revolt and Sparked a Crisis over Citizenship #ad - And britain to the brink of war.

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Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper

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Hill and Wang #ad - This is innovative American history at its best. When in 1827 he repeated the stunt in paterson, New Jersey, another mill town, an even larger audience gathered to cheer on the daredevil they would call the "Jersey Jumper. Inevitably, he went to niagara falls, where in 1829 he jumped not once but twice in front of thousands who had paid for a good view.

The distinguished social historian Paul E. Sam made a name for himself one day by jumping seventy feet into the tumultuous waters below Pawtucket Falls. The true history of a legendary american folk heroin the 1820s, a fellow named Sam Patch grew up in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, working there when he wasn't drinking as a mill hand for one of America's new textile companies.

Sam Patch, the Famous Jumper #ad - He also relates the real jumper to the mythic sam patch who turned up as a daring moral hero in the works of Hawthorne and Melville, in London plays and pantomimes, and in the spotlight with Davy Crockett—a Sam Patch who became the namesake of Andrew Jackson's favorite horse. In his shrewd and powerful analysis, Johnson casts new light on aspects of American society that we may have overlooked or underestimated.

Johnson gives this deceptively simple story all its deserved richness, revealing in its characters and social settings a virtual microcosm of Jacksonian America.

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